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Military Dads Serve as Doctor Dad, Too!

Being a military dad presents unique challenges - especially when it comes to deployment and fathering.

Dads can be away for long or extended periods of time due to deployment, and there are even situations when a military dad can't be present at his own child's birth. But that doesn't mean they can't benefit from learning the skills needed to be involved in the health, safety, and care of their baby. Military dads need to serve as Doctor Dad, too!

Military Dad and Facilitator in Doctor Dad session.

It's for reasons like these that the Army Community Service New Parent Support Program at Joint Base Lewis McChord offered the DoctorDad® workshop -- to increase self-assurance in new fathers by developing their parenting skills in the area of infant and toddler health.

DoctorDad® Workshops are presented as 60-90 minute stand-alone workshops, or as supplemental sessions to other fatherhood programming, and are great for new and expectant dads. The workshops help dads increase health literacy by providing them with the knowledge and skills they need to successfully care for their young children right from the start —from keeping children well, to taking care of a sick child, along with preventing injuries, and creating a safe home. Dads at organizations across the nation, and on military installations, benefit from this helpful program. 

According to an article by The Northwest Guardian about DoctorDad being offered at Joint Base Lewis McChord:

No rank, no commission, no promotion compares to the privilege of making it to “Daddy.” No adventure seems as satisfying as cuddling your newborn and seeing her first smile. Yet for all the joys fatherhood brings, anxiety over caring for a newborn can be overwhelming. How to know what that incessant crying means, why she refuses to eat, why she is fussy?

Researchers point to the importance of father involvement regarding child’s safety and future development. According to a study by the National Fatherhood Initiative, children have up to 30 percent higher chance of getting injured when dads are not involved.

Private First Class Matthew Burkett of 201st Battlefield Surveillance Brigade, (3rd Squadron, 38th Cavalry Regiment) wasn’t aware of the statistics when he decided to take the DoctorDad® class. Burkett was just concerned with understanding his 7-month-old daughter’s fussing and crying. “When the baby cries, you run down the list wondering which one it is,” Burkett said.

DoctorDad Bundle

Each DoctorDad® Workshop is structured in two two-hour sessions. For example, one session covers infant well being and health issues (such as understanding why they might cry,) and also proper nutrition and immunizations. Another session deals with child safety and proper emergency response. Sessions provide an open and supportive environment where dads can ask questions, exchange stories, and share advice.

According to Venice del Mundo-Davis, New Parent Support Program home visitor for Joint Base Lewis McChord, "There aren’t a lot of classes out there for new fathers to go to. DoctorDad® class offers practical and useful points in getting through the first few years of taking care of a child. We are also trying to help fathers realize they play a unique role in caring for their kids.”

During the sessions, dads even participate in hand-on demonstrations of newborn care such as changing a diaper, swaddling techniques to calm a baby, burping positions, giving medications, SIDS (prevention,) and more. The goal is to help dads to learn how they can take part in the care of their newborn and be supportive of their partner.

The Northwest Guardian article continues:

Private First Class Burkett was not surprised to find out his post-session questionnaire answers were correct and that one of the most important things in becoming a new parent is being involved in the child’s life.

He said, “I came to this class to make sure I do all the right things to raise my little girl and what I learned was like a confirmation that I already am."

DocotorDad® Workshops are available as four separate workshops, or as a bundle
Download the Overview Sheet below for more information!
Portions of this post reposted from The Northwest Guardian, newspaper of Joint Base Lewis-McChord.
 


Vote for the 2013 Military Fatherhood Award Winner!

Every year, National Fatherhood Initiative celebrates military fathers and families through our Military Fatherhood Award™.  We get hundreds of nominations and after narrowing down to four finalists, we turn to the American people to help us select an Awardee by voting on Facebook

Our finalists are going above and beyond in staying involved in their children's lives, despite the challenges of military life, and they are an inspiration to us.  We hope they'll inspire and encourage you too!

Ssgt Charlie Linville, 2013 Military Fatherhood Award FinalistSsgt Charlie Linville, U.S. Marine Corps - a combat veteran and Wounded Warrior, Ssgt Linville insisted on attending his daughter's first karate competition the day after having his leg amputated and continues to plan activites with his daughters, despite daily pain.



CPO Patrick Mondragon, 2013 Military Fatherhood Award finalistCPO Patrick Mondragon, U.S. Navy - CPO Mondragon was effectively a solo parent while caring for his wife and kids - and continuing to fulfill his military duties - during a life-threatening health complication his wife experienced. 

 


Ssgt Jorge Roman, 2013 Military Fatherhood Award finalistSsgt Jorge Roman, U.S. Army - a first-generation American, Ssgt Roman is fulfilling the American dream for his children, teaches them art and fitness, and has continued to parent his daughters during overseas deployments.

 


Maj. Kevin Billups, 2013 Military Fatherhood Award finalistMaj. Kevin Billups, U.S. Air Force - leaving for his eighth deployment in a few weeks, Maj. Billups is not only an involved father to his three children, he teaches other new military dads how to prepare for fatherhood and care for their little ones.

 

You can watch the videos their families created and vote for your favorite finalist on NFI's Facebook page.  Voting opens on Monday April 15 and closes on Sunday May 15.  You can vote once every 24 hours.

We're excited to introduce these wonderful dads as outstanding examples of fatherhood and to honor them for their service to the country.

Share this blog with other collegues and associates working in the fatherhood field!

Help us select the 2013 recipient of the Military Fatherhood Award!

Every year, National Fatherhood Initiative celebrates military fathers and families through our Military Fatherhood Award™.  We get hundreds of nominations and after narrowing down to four finalists, we turn to the American people to help us select an Awardee by voting on Facebook

Our finalists are going above and beyond in staying involved in their children's lives, despite the challenges of military life, and they are an inspiration to us.  We hope they'll inspire and encourage you too.

Ssgt Charlie Linville, 2013 Military Fatherhood Award FinalistSsgt Charlie Linville, U.S. Marine Corps - a combat veteran and Wounded Warrior, Ssgt Linville insisted on attending his daughter's first karate competition the day after having his leg amputated and continues to plan activites with his daughters, despite daily pain.


CPO Patrick Mondragon, 2013 Military Fatherhood Award finalistCPO Patrick Mondragon, U.S. Navy - CPO Mondragon was effectively a solo parent while caring for his wife and kids - and continuing to fulfill his military duties - during a life-threatening health complication his wife experienced.


Ssgt Jorge Roman, 2013 Military Fatherhood Award finalistSsgt Jorge Roman, U.S. Army - a first-generation American, Ssgt Roman is fulfilling the American dream for his children, teaches them art and fitness, and has continued to parent his daughters during overseas deployments.

Maj. Kevin Billups, 2013 Military Fatherhood Award finalistMaj. Kevin Billups, U.S. Air Force - leaving for his eighth deployment in a few weeks, Maj. Billups is not only an involved father to his three children, he teaches other new military dads how to prepare for fatherhood and care for their little ones.

You can watch the videos their families created and vote for your favorite finalist on NFI's Facebook pageVoting opens on Monday April 15 and closes on Sunday May 15.  You can vote once every 24 hours.

We're excited to introduce these wonderful dads as outstanding examples of fatherhood and to honor them for their service to the country.

Connect with The Father Factor by RSSFacebook and on Twitter @TheFatherFactor.

Nominate a dad for the 2013 Military Fatherhood Award!

Military Fatherhood Award: Honoring Military Fathers and Families
Every year, National Fatherhood Initiative honors a military dad who goes above and beyond in his service to the nation and his responsibility as a dad.

NFI's Military Fatherhood Award™ recognizes and celebrates a dad who:

  • demonstrates ongoing dedication to his children
  • puts in extraordinary effort to stay connected with his kids
  • successfully balances his military duties and family life
  • invests in other military fathers and children

If you know a great military dad, nominate him for the 2013 Military Fatherhood Award™ today!  Nominations close on Monday February 4 at 12:00 p.m. EST, and we can only accept the first 600 nominations, so submit yours quickly!  (See Terms and Conditions to answer most questions about the award program.)

Share this blog post using the buttons at the top of the post to let other military friends and family know about this opportunity to nominate their dad or a dad they know!

 

Sponsors of the 2013 Military Fatherhood Award:
as of January 17, 2013

Protect and Defend Sponsors

Nissan USA   Acumen Solutions, Inc.

Supporting Friends

Boy Scouts of America

 

If you are connected with a company that would be interested in sponsoring, contact Renae Smith at rsmith@fatherhood.org.  Download the sponsorship kit here.

Military Fatherhood Award Finalists on Fox & Friends

fox-and-friendsThis Sunday morning at 9:20 am eastern, tune in to Fox & Friends on the Fox News Channel to see our three Military Fatherhood Award finalists interviewed live!

And remember to cast your vote for your favorite once a day, every day until May 25 on NFI's Facebook page.

It Must Be Tough Being A Military Dad

In my previous job, I traveled around the country quite a bit by airplane. I got a kick out of seeing military personnel returning home to loved ones at some of the international airports I visited, and I loved seeing families and friends hugging and crying with one another after reuniting. I always imagined what a deep feeling of relief it was for families, especially fathers, who were deployed abroad to come back home to loving arms.

This week, a little girl in Utah got the surprise of her life during a show-and-tell in her elementary school class. Five-year-old Baylee was speaking in front of her kindergarten class talking about the things she loves. As her teacher helps her with the presentation, she then points to a photo of her father, which makes Baylee perk up a bit. The teacher then points to the left and her dad walks in with little Baylee leaping into her dad’s arms – so excited, the cute kid loses a shoe!

I defy anyone, no matter how tough they are, to hold back tears of joy after hearing Baylee excitedly wrap her arms around her father Sgt. Adam Page. “How did you ever make it,” said Baylee repeatedly as dad was overcome with emotion. Watching Sgt. Page hold his daughter was a priceless moment that none will ever forget.

Sgt. Page had been deployed to Afghanistan, and has since returned to his native Utah. It will be the first time he’s lived with his family since the birth of his little one. One must wonder, how tough was it on this dad while he was away from his family. I was away from my daughter for just 8 months once for work, and I was so sad without her. I can’t imagine the weight dads who serve in the name of our country have to carry.

Thankfully, there are resources and other helpful things that can assist military fathers while they’re deployed abroad. Video chats, email, letters and even simple phone calls can help ease the pangs caused by the distance. The rewards, if dads and families can be patient and loving, are moments like we saw between Baylee and Adam. It is beyond obvious that as much as he could be, Sgt. Page was a solid fixture in his child’s life.

For military dads soon to be deployed or already serving abroad, NFI offers a handy resource called Deployed Fathers & Families: Guide For Military Personnel. This guide provides fathers with great tips such as managing money, taking care of medical needs, and also covers legal matters as well. Click here to learn more about our offerings for military dads.

And don’t forget there’s just a few days left to nominate a military dad for NFI’s annual Military Fatherhood Award! Click here to nominate a military dad today! Voting ends this Sunday, February 5 at 11:59 PM EST!

The Thankful Campaign: A Military Dad: Thankful for Restored Relationships

This is a post by Tim Red, NFI's Director of Military Program Support Services. After spending 30 years in the U.S. Army, Tim now leads NFI's efforts to help the U.S. military add fatherhood programming to its work to support military families. Tim and his wife have four children and live in Texas. Tim contributes this blog post as part The Thankful Campaign and shares his personal experience about realizing that sometimes the things we're thankful for come out of the hardest experiences of life.

I am thankful for my improved relationship with my oldest son (Travis). My mobilization/deployment from July 2005 through December 2006 affected him more than any of my kids. It put distance in our relationship that I did not know or understand. He told me three summers ago that he quit praying the day I got on that plane to go overseas. In the last four years there has really been calm only once for about a two month span in the spring of 2009. Things got very ugly in July of this year - so bad that I had to give an ultimatum that changed his life.

Since then, we have talked more in the last three and a half months than we had in the previous four years. I am thankful for the changes he has made in his life and continues to make. We have still got a long way to go, but if you would have told me we would be at this point after the events of July, I would say you were crazy. I never thought we could come so far so fast. So I am very thankful for having my son back.

I am also thankful for the young men and women that serve our country all around this world. I am thankful for their military families who support them. And I am thankful for the services that are provided by the Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps and Coast Guard to support our military families.

To learn more about NFI's work with the military, visit www.fatherhood.org/military.

Help us Honor Braydon's Dad

Last week we posted this article about Braydon Nichols and his father, Army Chief Warrant Officer Bryan Nichols, who died tragically in the downing of a US helicopter in Eastern Afghanistan on August 6th.



After posting this, our staff here at NFI was left wondering…what can we do? We were so touched by his story and wanted to honor this little boy and his father in a tangible way.



Upon researching this tragic event further, we discovered that there were at least 10 other fathers who died in that crash leaving behind 22 children. So, Braydon’s story was just one of 22 other tragic stories unfolding that week.



In response, we have created a campaign, “Honor Braydon’s Dad.” This campaign will collect donations to support other military families on the bases of the fallen soldiers. The donations will be used to provide these families with our Deployed Fathers and Families Guide™ (and other resources) to help during difficult deployments.



We at the National fatherhood Initiative wish to send our condolences to those who lost loved ones on August 6th, 2011 and thank them for all that they have sacrificed. Visit Honor Braydon’s Dad to donate today.

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