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The Father Factor

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NFI's 'Fatherhood Commercial of the Year': And the Winner is...

Each year, we let you pick the "Fatherhood Commercial of the Year". While it's important to point out when culture & media are doing damage to fatherhood through bad depictions of fathers, it is even more important to shine a light on the brands who “get it.” 
nfi's fatherhood commercial of the yearThe following five commercials represent what is “right” about how the culture & the media can build up fatherhood and help us in our work to ensure every child has a 24/7 Dad™. 

You voted for your favorite video from the following brands (keep reading for winner!):

Dove Men Care > "Mission: Care"
Watch as John's family reunite just outside of his U.S. military base. John is one of 300 service men to travel home thanks to the Operation Homefront and Dove Men+Care's "Mission: Care" Campaign.


Craftsman > "Made to Make"
"Surrounding you lies earth, wire, wood, glass, steal, brick and stone, just waiting to be made great. Go ahead and make something of it and inspire the rest of us. We are and always will be…made to make.”


Chevy Trucks > "Strong"

“Everybody knows he ain’t just tough, he’s strong.” Watch the video and see why we fell in love with the commercial.

Tide > "The Princess Dress"
You know that outfit your son or daughter just can't live without? Well this dad has a trick up his sleeve so he can wash his daughter's favorite princess dress. Dads, take note!


And the video with the most votes, and winning NFI's "Fatherhood Commercial of the Year" is...

Extra Gum > "Origami"
Watch this video in a safe place—it will make you cry!

 

Thank you for voting and congratulations to Extra Gum for winning NFI's "Fatherhood Commercial of the Year". Thank you, Extra Gum, for being a brand who understands the unique and irreplacable role a father plays in a child's life. Thank you for reminding us that fatherhood changes everything. 

Pampers Gets Pops

Pampers Gifts to GrowLast month at Pampers Cincinnati, OH headquarters, NFI president Roland C. Warren presented the big baby care brand with a Fatherhood Award™ for its “A Parent is Born,” “Welcome to Parenthood,” and “Love Comes Early” video series.

If you haven’t seen these online mini-documentaries, check them out as a Father’s Day treat. They really do an incredible job of showing how important it is for fathers to be involved in the “peri-natal period” (the time right before and after the birth of a child).

Pampers is a rare breed in the baby care world in that they are one of a few brands that understands the role dads can and should play in this area. Sure, moms still buy more diapers than dads do, but according to all the research we’ve done and seen, moms are more likely to support brands that support fathers. Moms don’t want brands letting dads off the hook.

To celebrate and commemorate the Fatherhood Award™ recognition, Pampers is unveiling new rewards in its “Pampers Gifts to Grow” catalog that are very dad-centric - BBQ tool sets, professional-caliber golf balls, stainless steel water bottle gift sets, and headphones, to name a few.

pampers NFIThis quote from Fama Francisco, Pampers General Manager perfectly sums up Pampers enlightened understanding of this issue: "Pampers recognizes that today’s fathers want to be involved in the very important role of nurturing their babies and acknowledges that it is just as important for dad – as it is for mom - to bond with baby too. With all the attention on expectant and new moms, the role of an expectant or new father can sometimes be overshadowed. That's why this Fatherhood Award™ honor is a special thrill. Whether it's been via our web-based real parenting video series or our past partnerships with the likes of great dads, Pampers is committed to honoring and celebrating dads for the unique role they play in their babies lives!”

We love this! Especially the part about the “unique role” that dads play. Again, research shows that the different approaches that moms and dads take to child care have a significant, positive impact on child well being.

We thank Pampers for their dedication to fatherhood, and commend them for doing work that will last far beyond this Father’s Day.

No Child Beauty Pageants For My Daughter, Please

Reality television is literally like a train wreck. On some shows, one can witness the worst in human behavior, yet people still watch faithfully. There have even been “viewing parties” held during some of the more popular programs, a fact that still baffles me to this day.

One such program I had the displeasure of watching was controversial TLC show “Toddlers & Tiaras,” which profiles child beauty pageant contestants and their families. Already in its fifth season since premiering in 2009, the show is popular for all the wrong reasons.

The mothers of the young pageant contestants all push their girls, some young as two, to emotional and physical limits. They parade the little girls around in makeup, big hairdos, and even bathing suits. In the few times I’ve watched the show, I’ve never seen a father be involved in the shenanigans. As a father of a daughter, it troubles me to see little girls be put through the rigors of a pageant. I wondered often if the fathers are in the lives of the girls and how they felt about seeing their child in that light.

Perhaps I have a narrow male perspective but there is something limiting in this preemie beauty pageant nonsense that suggests the only goals these mothers have for their little girls is a life of preening and primping. I don’t see how a beauty pageant, especially at such young ages, promotes anything other than vanity. I would be appalled to watch the mother of my child force her to do something that adds such little value to her life.

I’m not alone in this thinking, as recent news suggests that the trend of child pageants teeters close to indecency. In France, lawmakers have banned child beauty pageants; this after a 10-year old girl was featured on the cover of Vogue Paris in attire not fit for a child. I don’t know if such a ban could happen here but I’m taking a stand for fathers who would rather see other ideals promoted in their little girls. Beauty and fashion are fine things to aspire towards, but what message does this ultimately send?

Just this week, the father of JonBenet Ramsey, the murdered beauty pageant contestant, came forward this week and called the Toddlers & Tiaras show “bizzare” although he allowed his child to participate. Reading his story, John Ramsey showed serious regret in letting his daughter enter the contests. I am in no way suggesting that JonBenet’s participation in these events led to her passing. Instead, I am glad to see one father finally speak up against the practice.

I happen to think my daughter is beautiful and worthy of being a supermodel should she choose that life as she gets older. For now, she has a lot of growing up to do and I’m in no rush to speed her down that path. Fathers, it’s ok to speak up for your little girls in cases like this. We have to protect our princesses any way we can.

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